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  • -= Mercurious Chat =- (brand Chat Log)Hosted by Daniel Brandenstein of NASA

    Brian Dannemiller - Moderator at Space Ed from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    Welcome to the Space Explorers, Inc., chat with astronaut Daniel C. Brandenstein.

    Brian Dannemiller - Moderator at Space Ed from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    Room opened by Moderator on 03/16/04 at 11:25.

    dalton goulden - Chat Guest at lagston from hot springs, ar asks:
    is it hard to sleep in space?

    I didn't have any trouble sleeping in space. I slept floating free and didn't use the sleeping bag provided. It was like sleeping on the ultimate waterbed.....absolutely no pressure points. Dan

    Jean Durrett - Teacher at Maedgen Elementary School from Lubbock, Texas asks:
    What would make it possible for astronauts to visit Mars, considering the effects of space flight on the human body and the time it takes to get to Mars?

    The most important item is a viable program with national support and adequate funding. Radiation is probably the biggest concern, but the crew module could be shielded to provide the protection. The effects of weighlessness can be contracted with various exercise protocols. Keeping the mind stimulated for that long of trip would probably be the biggest challenge. Dan

    Elizabeth - Student at Tellico Plains Junior High Sch from Tellico Plains, Tennessee asks:
    what's the tempeature up there?

    In the shuttle and space station, it is very comfortable and you can set the temp where you like it just like in your home. However, outside it is about 250 degrees F in the sun and about minus 250 degress F in the shade. The vehicles and spacesuits do a great job of protecting you from those extremes. Dan

    Nancy Sanquist - Chat Guest at University of Minnesota from Minneapolis, MN asks:
    What do you find of interest in the current Mars mission?

    Is this the Nancy that grew up across the street from me? Finding the evidence that water once existed is very interesting. I think there will be many more interesting finds before the missions are complete. In fact, I'm going to a lecture tonight to get the latest from a couple of the scientists working the missions.

    Talanda Smith - Chat Guest at Langston from Hot Spring, AR asks:
    What do you drink in space?

    You drink a wide variety of drinks. Anything that comes in powdered from and can be rehydrated can be used. Tea, lemonade, gatorade and water were my favorites...........dry milk is lousy, it just doesn't taste like real milk. Dan

    Shelly Clark - Teacher at Langston Aerospace Environ from Hot Springs, Arkansas asks:
    How did a nongravity enviroment affect your body?

    The human body adapts very well to zero gravity in a couple hours. It actually takes longer to readapt to earth's gravity when you return. However, there are no lasting effects. Dan

    Talanda Smith - Chat Guest at Langston from Hot Spring, AR asks:
    How do you eat in space

    You eat with the same utensils as you do on earth, but you have to be careful not to spill anything. If you do, it doesn't fall to the floor where you can wipe it up, it floats in every direction and makes a real mess. Dan

    Kristen Graham - Teacher at Fort Street Elementary from Mars Hill, Maine asks:
    What is the scariest thing that has happened to you while being an astronaut?

    Driving down any highway in Houston is the scariest. We train very hard and long for a mission and I was always very confident in the ability of myself and my crew when we launched. This removed the "scary" factor from the flights for me............it may not be the same for everyone. Dan

    Cassandra Burnham - Teacher at Fsu School from Tallahassee, Florida asks:
    What is "CAPCOM"?

    CAPCPM stands for capsule communicator and is the person in the Mission Control Center who is the only person that talks to the crew during the mission. The name is a holdover from the early days when the crew flew in a capsule. Dan

    Lori Ruebowden - Teacher at Haddonfield Middle School from Haddonfield, New Jersey asks:
    Mr. Brandenstein, When you flew in the shuttles, if you could have changed anything about the design of the shuttle, what would you change? Also, knowing that you work for Lockheed Martin's space operations, is Lockheed designing a new space vehicle?

    The shuttle is a very good design, but it does have some vunerable areas when you consider the very hostile environment it must operate in. The thermal protection system is what I would have changed, but there were no better alternatives, so it is kind of an academic answer. Lockheed Martin is looking at President Bush's new space exploration initiative and will offer designs to meet the mission requirements. Dan

    Nancy Lamers - Chat Guest at University of Minnesota from Minneapolis, MN asks:
    Hi Dan, You spotted me. I used Sanquist hoping you'd recognize the name. Thanks for the note.

    Good to hear from you.

    Shelly Clark - Teacher at Langston Aerospace Environ from Hot Springs, Arkansas asks:
    Do you like working on the CAPCOM ?

    I was the CAPCOM for the first and second shuttle missions and liked the job very much, but I liked flying the missions even more. Dan

    Cassandra Burnham - Teacher at Fsu School from Tallahassee, Florida asks:
    Do you drink out of sippy cups?

    No, the powder comes in aluminum packets that you inject water into and then drink the liquid through a straw that has an "on-off" valve. Dan

    dalton goulden - Chat Guest at lagston from hot springs, ar asks:
    Do you miss home when you are in space?

    My longest mission was 12 days, so it wasn't gone long enough to really miss home. Astronaut on the Space Station stay up to much longer and do miss home. Dan

    Walt Hoffman - Teacher at East Elementary School from Greenville, Pennsylvania asks:
    Fourth Grader Tim asks: What was the most important thing you did in college that prepared you for becoming an astronaut?

    I chose a course of study that had aerospace applications, in my case math and physics, and studied hard to get good grades. I also was active in numerous extracurricular activities to develop my leadership and teamwork skills. Dan

    Jerry Von Bon - Chat Guest at from St. Petersburg, FL asks:
    Are you a cheese head?

    Once a cheese head always a cheese head even though I haven't lived there since 1965. Dan

    Bonnie Robertson - Chat Guest at Red Smith from Green Bay, Wis. asks:
    When you were in space, which planets were you able to see?

    I only recall seeing Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Uranus and Saturn. We didn't have a telescope on board so all I had was my naked eyes.

    mary Ann Ehrike - Chat Guest at Douglas Elem. School from Watertown, wisconsin asks:
    when will you be in Wisconsin again?

    I hope to get a chance to visit my folks sometime this summer. Dan

    Brian Dannemiller - Moderator at Space Ed from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    The chat room will be closing in 5 or so minutes. Thank you for joining us. And we would especially like to thank astronaut Daniel Brandenstein for being our guest today. Please join us next month for our last chat scheduled for the spring. Dr. Martha Gilmore will chat about Mars Rover & Geology Autonomously on Thursday, April 8, 2004 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CST. More live online chats will be scheduled for next fall.

    Cassandra Burnham - Teacher at Fsu School from Tallahassee, Florida asks:
    How did you decide to become an astronaut?

    I had an interest in aviation and flying as far back as I can remember and flying in space seem to be the ultimate challenge in that field, so that is what I chose to pursue. I always liked a challenge that's also why I chose the Navy over the Air Force.......landing on an aircraft carrier vice a long runway. Dan

    Cassandra Burnham - Teacher at Fsu School from Tallahassee, Florida asks:
    How does the space suit work?

    It is actually a little spaceship. I provides pressure to protect you against the vacuum of space, oxygen for breathing and thermal protection from the heat and cold of space. It works really well, but is kind of bulky. Dan

    Jovanna Magersuppe - Chat Guest at Discovery Key from Lake Worth, FL asks:
    What did you have to study in college?

    My majors were math and physics plus the other required courses to get a BS degree. However, there are many different academic backgrounds in the Astronaut Corp. Dan

    Jovanna Magersuppe - Chat Guest at Discovery Key from Lake Worth, FL asks:
    Did you have an difficulties controlling the space ship?

    No, the space shuttle flies very well both in space and in the atmosphere during approach and landing. Dan

    Walt Hoffman - Teacher at East Elementary School from Greenville, Pennsylvania asks:
    Fourth Grader Nico asks: What do you think about the news of a possible tenth planet?

    I just heard a little about it last night. I think it is great .............that is why it is important to continue to explore..........there is still a lot to learn about our universe. Dan

    Walt Hoffman - Teacher at East Elementary School from Greenville, Pennsylvania asks:
    rth grader Olivia asks: Which space flight was the most memorable for you ?

    My last one because it was the first flight of the Space Shuttle Endeavour and because we had a very challenging mission capturing a big satellite and repairing it. Dan

    Brian Dannemiller - Space Ed Staff at Space Ed from De Pere, Wisconsin asks:
    Thank you for chatting with us.

    You're welcome, I enjoyed it. Dan

    Brian Dannemiller - Moderator at Space Ed from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    3/16/2004 12:32:47 PM - Room closed by Moderator. Thank you for your participation.

     
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