• Planetary Times Newsletter
  • Opinion Corner
  • Message Board
  • Space Calendar
  • Featured Classes
  • Testimonials
  • Press Kit
  • Classroom Publicity Kit
  • Release Forms
  • Archived Online Chats
  • Contests
  • Space Fun
  • Trivia Corner
  • Orbital Laboratory® Payload III
  • Marslink®
  • Moonlink®
  • Space Explorers
  • -= Mercurious Chat =- (zabala08 Chat Log)During this online chat, 171 questions were asked by 13 schools. There were 20 adults and 28 students involved in this chat.

    Hosted by Veronica Zabala of Arizona State University

    Elizabeth Schmeisser - Moderator at Space Explorers, Inc. from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    Room opened by Moderator on 04/15/08 at 13:00.

    Elizabeth Schmeisser - Moderator at Space Explorers, Inc. from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    Space Explorers would like to welcome Veronica Zabala-Aliberto as our host today. All of your questions will be viewed by a moderator. We will try to get through as many questions as possible during the chat period. Ask away!

    jennifer - Chat Guest at from , asks:
    How are kids going to live on mars?

    That is a very good question Jennifer. I have actually conducted analogue missions to the Mars Desert Research Station in which incorporates children living, studying and playing in a martian regime.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    What type of materialswould you need?

    Hello Mahana. Materials for what?

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    What kind of materials would you need to go to Mars?

    Well, it depends what your goals are and what you are studying. A planetary geologist, for example, would need a rock hammer, something similiar to a hand lens and chemicals to test rock and mineral specimens.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    How does NASA and the team at Arizona State University anticipate that the astronaut colony/ mission will be able to extract water from Mars?

    Actually, there are no direct stufdies, that I am aware of, that study colonization here at ASU (related to Mars). I have done my own studies at the Mars Desert Research Station in southern Utah to study those issues.

    James Busby - Chat Guest at from Downey, CA asks:
    Considering the dust issues that we have very little information about- how robust do you believe the rovers should be?

    Hello Jim! The rovers should be very robust. They should incorporate new technologies that will prevent the build up of dust on the rovers. The Mars Exploration Rovers have done a fantastic job with respect to this.

    Amber Hunt - Teacher at The Academy At High Point from Aurora, Colorado asks:
    Hi Veronica, I am Amber Hunt, a first grade teacher at The Academy at High Point in Colorado. My class is beginning to study a Solar System unit and has some questions for you: Jacob wants to know why do we have earth and is space always black? Ethan asks why are Jupiter and Saturn the biggest planets? Kameron wants to know what is the biggest planet? Jaela asks are there really aliens? Jordan asks is Saturn blue and white? Bryanna asks what is the circle on or around Neptune?

    Hello. Well, for Jacob...Earth is a special place. It is like Goldi Locks. Remember how what she was eating was too hot and too cold? Well, Earth is the same with respect to that and its distance from the Sun. We are in a place that is just right for our planet and to support life. Ethan, Jupiter and Saturn are so massive due to the fact that they are gaseous planets. Gas expands! Hello Kameron! The biggest planet in our Solar System is Jupiter.

    Patrick Lonchar - Chat Guest at from Scottsdale, Arizona asks:
    I believe that both of the rovers have been in different areas of Mars that suggest or show evidence of past water. Have we been able to find any sedimentary rocks (limestone, shale, sandstone) in these areas on Mars that on Earth have easily able to support fossilization? Has there been any real effort to use the RAT or other tools to search for fossils in Mars rocks? Is it even possible with the rovers to find fossils?

    Hello Patrick! Yes, Mars Rovers Sharpen Questions About Livable Conditions: Like salt used as a preservative, high concentrations of dissolved minerals in the wet, early-Mars environment known from discoveries by NASA's Opportunity rover may have thwarted any microbes from developing or surviving.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    Do you have any experience with projected settlements on the moon? How would they differ from Mars, outside of the ordinary - temp, distance etc?

    The Moon has always been a training ground for us. We will develop the protocols necessary and train her on Earth in preparation for our return to the Moon. There are always new contests to get the general public's opinion on how the settlements should be. They would differ due to increased knowledge of the atmosphere and the regimes in which the settlements would reside in.

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    will we build our living and working modules there and use some mars materials

    Yes! We can use the surface materials to build new living and working modules. We can also, it is believed, live in lava tubes, both on the Moon and Mars!

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    have there ever been any studies on including animals on the mars mission

    No Kathy, not that I am aware of.

    Paul & Jeffrey - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Why don't jupiter have no land its all clouds

    That is a very good question. The coulds are very thick and we are still learning more about the outer planets, including Jupiter. We really do not know for sure if it does or does not have land under the cloudy atmosphere.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    have you met another astronut who have seen a alian?

    I have met many Astronauts and thus far, no one has seen any Aliens.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    What do you see as the best / most efficient way to travel to Mars?

    Excellent question! There are many theories. The cheapest would be the best way. There are many books and stories about how to get there. All I can say is that when our technology improves with each new NASA mission, so will our changes of getting to Mars in the most efficient and safest way possible.

    Valerie - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    what was the distance from earth to mars..how did figer it out

    Here is a great website to help you with that question: http://athena.cornell.edu/kids/tommy_tt_issue3.html

    Paul & Jeffrey - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Since their are more than 2000 galaxys doesn't that mean there possibly life on other planets

    Absolutely! It would be a very lonely Universe if we were the only ones!

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    Living under ground on Mars,would we be safe from solar radiation

    Yes Kevin, it is believed that deep in the surface, we would be protected from the harsh environment and radiation. We can also thrive in lava tubes which would provide shelter.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    Will you stay in Mars if you had the chance?

    Anyone who knows me well enough knows that I would definitely go, without hesitation.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    how many moons do mars have?

    Mars has two moon, Phobos and Diemos.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    What kind of games would you play if you lived on Mars?

    I would like to actually invent new games, especially with less gravity! I love puzzles and taking pictures but for games, I would have to say running in a spacesuit would be kind of fun (and difficult) at the same time.

    Jose - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    How many rover missions has their been on mars?

    Three Jose. The Pathfinder mission (1) and the Mars Exploration Rover Mission (2).

    Jennifer & Qua Vyana - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    How are we going to survive on Mars

    Very interesting and tough question Jennifer and Qua! We would have to train for a good number of years before we go. WE would have to learn medicine, geology, engineering, astronomy, etc. The people who go to Mars, even though they may have degrees from College, would have to learn new and even challenging disciplines to master to survive on Mars.

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    Do you think Phoenix will find water for fuel and microable past or present

    It is hoped that it will find something to help us better understand the planet's past and current conditions. We have a couple of more months before we all can find out that answer!

    Jennifer & Qua Vyana - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Why do blackholes occur?

    I do not know too much about Black holes, sorry BUT here is a great website to go to for more information: http://amazing-space.stsci.edu/resources/explorations/blackholes/teacher/sciencebackground.html

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    how many missions do you have?

    Mahana, hello. Which missions are you referring to? If you are talking about simulated Mars missions, I have been involved with 5 of them at the Mars Desert Research Station. I study geology, engineering and human factors to help me better understand what we will expect on our missions.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    What kind of space ships do you use to go to mars?

    Well, we are hoping to use the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that NASA is currently building for us to go back to the Moon Mahana. To find out what it looks like you can visit the following website: www.nasa.gov

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    whats been your biggest challenge so far living and working on the mars base on earth

    You have to ration out your junk food VERY carefully. Just kidding. Really, seeing how the children interact with the other crew members. Making sure the children do their homework and stay up to date with the children and their studies back on "Earth".

    Paul & Jeffrey - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Is there really life on one of Jupiter's moons?

    Great question! You guys are really thinking like scientists! There is a strong possibility that life may exist on the moon Europa. It is an ice planet with a salt water ocean underneath all the ice. And, as you know, where there is water, there is a great chance for life to be present! Look at our own planet and compare and contrast.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    how much food does NASA anticipate having to take on the mars mission to sustain the enitre crew?

    Well, we are hoping to grow our food while we are in transit to Mars. We will bring some items but we would like to grow our food as well. How much, is still being debated. It would be rationed out just like the soliders in the military get their food rationed out while they are on their missions.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    What is the anticipated amount of living space that each astronaut will need/be provided?

    Well, at the Mars Desert Research Station we had a room the size of a closet (roughly 4' x 10'). That was fine for us. I am unsure what the dimensions of proposed concepts are currently. The numbers change all the time.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    Do kids go to other planets?

    Well, my own children (3 of them: a ges 14, 13, and 10) have participated in simulated Mars missions. No children have actually participated in NASA missions though. Hoepfully someday they will. Would you like to go?

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    Do you think,we will step foot on mars by 2030

    Kevin, that is the wish of many people. If you ask me, we are way over due going to Mars already. No later than 2030 would be nice.

    Paul & Jeffrey - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    How many moons does Neptune have?

    Neptune has 8 moons but it may have more that we do not see.

    Paul & Jeffrey - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Are we really merging with another galaxy

    Hello Paul and Jeffrey! Well, yes. Our own Universe is expanding.

    Jennifer & Qua Vyana - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    When do you perdict that people going to live on Mars?

    Hoepfully no later than 2030.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    yes

    Well, for more information about going to the Mars Desert Research Station you can go to this website to learn more: www.marssociety.org. My last Crew mission was Crew 68 in March. You can view those records and pictures and see if you would like to participate in a future simulated Mars mission.

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    Do they allow guests and the mars base to come and try living like its on mars

    Yes. You can go to: www.marssociety.org/MDRS for more information.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    How do you see the astronauts compensating for the gravitational differences on Mars?

    It would be too much of a difference. Your training would allow you to recognize the difference.

    Sam - Chat Guest at Delta Cyber School from Delta Junction, Alaska asks:
    How long do you think it will take to go to Mars and beyond?

    Hello Sam. With our current technology, it would take roughly 6 months to get to Mars. As our technology improves with each mission, we can decrease that time.

    Valerie - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    do you ever wonder what it really feel like to be on mars

    Everyday. That's why I do what I do and I get involved with as much as I can. The more you are involved in Valerie, the more you learn. That's why I also conduct simulated missions to help create the protocols necessary for when we do go to Mars.

    Rhoda & Kiara - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Do you think WE will have to live on Mars?

    Well, with our population increasing and the need for new resources becomes more apparent, we will have to start finding a new home. The moon is the cloest and Mars is the next best place after that.

    Paul & Jeffrey - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    How are the colonies built

    Great question! Here is a perfect website that will anseer that question for one answer would not suffice: http://www.nss.org/settlement/

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    how can you get air from earth to mars?

    Actually, we can use the carbon dioxide from Mars and do some chemistry to break that down to water we can drink and clean ourselves with, oxygen to breathe and even methane to give us fuel. So, that being said, chemistry, math and technology is very important to study.

    Sam - Chat Guest at Delta Cyber School from Delta Junction, Alaska asks:
    Is it difficult to find safe landing sites on the moon or on any planet?

    No, not really Sam. We have some excellent Engineers that will help us. WIth both scientists and engineers working together we will be able to find the safest and scientifically interesting places to land on the Moon.

    Dr. Ali Fant - Guest Teacher at John Fredson School from Venetie, Alaska asks:
    What economic (money) reasons do people have to work on Mars?

    Hello Dr. Fant. It is not just economic but scientific reasons why we would like to go to Mars. We can also find new resources that would better our life here on Earth. It will also notonly increase scientific knowledge but increase resources and international partnerships.

    Michael - Chat Guest at MCcutcheon from Chicago, IL asks:
    Do you think we will be able to go on other planets like Neptune or Saturn?

    It is hoped that we do Micheal. I am really interested in Titan. We can use the hydrcarbons on that moon to synthesize food and plastics! It can act like a "pit stop" to go further out in the Solar System.

    Dr. Ali Fant - Guest Teacher at John Fredson School from Venetie, Alaska asks:
    Were you influenced by the television show/movie "Lost in Space" about a family space explorers?

    No, I wanted to implement the theories and get hard data (which I have). Human factors is critical when dealing with missions to the Moon and Mars. I am heavily involved with outreach and firmly believe that we must educate and inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers and explorers.

    Jennifer & Qua Vyana - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    If we move to Mars do we have to build a new city?

    Not so much a city but we will have to use small martian habitats to live in.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    how does it look like in mars?

    Well, I cannot tell you firsthand, unfortunately Mahana, what it looks like from Mars. What I can tell you that the Mars Exploration Rovers have enabled us to see martian sunsets. Look at it here: http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20050610a.html

    Dat & Michael - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    THANK YOU

    :) You are very welcome!

    Michael - Chat Guest at MCcutcheon from Chicago, IL asks:
    Thank You for everthing

    Anytime. Please feel free to contact me at Arizona State University if you have anymore questions: Veronica.Zabala@asu.edu

    Jose - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    how would people be able to breath if they did live on mars without a spacesuit

    Well, you would live in a pressurized martian habitat. That is the only way.

    Mahana - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    Does it ever get hot on mars?

    The daytime SURFACE temperature is about 80 F during rare summer days, to -200 F at the poles in winter. The AIR temperature, however, rarely gets much above 32 F.

    Jeffey & Paul - Chat Guest at Mccutcheon from Chicago, Illinois asks:
    How do the Mars rovers work?

    That's a very good question. There is a lot of engineering involved that I cannot get into here but I can give you this website for more information: http://science.howstuffworks.com/mars-rover2.htm

    Paul & Jeffery - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary School from Chicago, Illinois asks:
    What are the most important parts of the Mars rover?

    Everything! The cameras to take the fantastic Mars pictures. The solar panels in order to ensure that the rovers have engery to work. The wheels in order to go from place to place. But, now that I think about it, it is the people engineers and the scientists who have built to rovers and studied the pictures to let us know what we are looking at on Mars!

    Sam - Chat Guest at Delta Cyber School from Delta Junction, Alaska asks:
    Are you more excited or nervous about the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission?

    I am sooooo excited! I cannot wait until it launches! How about you?

    Elizabeth Schmeisser - Moderator at Space Explorers, Inc. from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    For the most up-to-date and complete listing of future chat events, please check out http://www.space-explorers.com/internal/events/chats.html. This was our final chat of the school year. We look forward to chatting with you again!

    Paul & Rodolfo - Chat Guest at McCutcheon Elementary from Chicago, IL asks:
    Thank you for your time.

    Thank you Paul and Rodolfo

    Patrick - Chat Guest at from Scottsdale, Arizona asks:
    Have we found any sedimentary rocks (limestone, shale, sandstone) on Mars in the areas where we think there might have been once been water where we could find fossils?

    Hello Patrick! There may be regimes composed of sedimentary rock that dates from the earliest span of martian history, between 4.3. and 3.5 billion years ago. Mars Global Surveyor has sent back beautiful images of layered terrain that may have been emplaced by wind and water! As for fossils, that may be a possibility but we need to explore more to find those answers.

    Dr. Ali Fant - Guest Teacher at John Fredson School from Venetie, Alaska asks:
    What sort of education do you need on Mars?

    The Astronauts for Mars need to be just as multi-disciplined as the Apollo Astronauts were. Engineering, science and technology is crucial for our future Explorers!

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    How do you anticipate that the Mars colony will get rid of their biological and material wastes?

    Good question Kathy. They would recycle it just as the Astronaut do on the International Space Station.

    Kathy Bosiak - Teacher at Lincolnton High School from Lincolnton, North Carolina asks:
    What is the best way to prevent muscle and bone mass loss on an extended trip and/or stay on Mars or the Moon?

    Just like on the International Space Station, Astronauts need to exercise daily. They need to be in excellent condition and eat the right foods and exercise.

    Jose - Student at Wonder Park from Anchorage, Alaska asks:
    how do people walk in space?

    Spacewalk! Actually Jose, they "float" in space. The Moon and Mars has less gravity so you would actually hop instead of walk on the surface.

    Kevin Koski - Teacher at Solar Ambassador from Cascade, Wisconsin asks:
    can we use green house and the sun to grow our food

    Yes. I actually enjoyed my daily chores at the Mars Desert Research Station's GreenHab. We grew our vegetables there. It was so nice being in the GreenHab.

    Dr. Ali Fant - Guest Teacher at John Fredson School from Venetie, Alaska asks:
    What the age requirements to participate in the Mars Desert Research Stations at Devon Island and in Utah?

    Actually, there is no set age limitations. My children were the youngest on their first mission. My son was 7, and my two daughters were 10 and 11 years old when they first went. Besides for another student who participated in our mission in last year's field season (who was 14 at the time) my children are the youngest to participate in a martian analogue regime.

    Sam - Chat Guest at Delta Cyber School from Delta Junction, Alaska asks:
    How long is the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission going to be?

    As long as it can be Sam. Just like the Mars Exploration Rovers, if the mission is still in a nominal phase (that it is doing everything it is suppose to and is surviving) then we would ask for an extension for the mission to get more money to keep acquiring the data we need.

    Elizabeth Schmeisser - Moderator at Space Explorers, Inc. from De Pere, Wisconsin comments:
    4/15/2008 2:47:04 PM - Room closed by Moderator. Thank you for your participation.

     
    Site MapPrivacy Policy